School Factions

Floreat Park Primary School

School Factions

Floreat Park Primary School has proud history when it comes to sport.

Our students are passionate about both their faction and school, and show great sportsmanship at the same time.

We have four factions – Beecroft (blue), Perry (green), Reabold (yellow) and Chandler (red). Children will be designated a faction when they commence at our school, and usually siblings will be in the same faction.

These factions have a rich history, so to help you understand their roots, we have included a brief summary below.

Beecroft

Bertha Beecroft was a member of the Perth City Council from 1954-1984 and was Deputy Lord Mayor of Perth from 1976-1977.

The focus of her work was the local community. She was the first woman chair for the Lotteries Commission of Western Australia, was on the Board of Visitors of Claremont Hospital; a member of the Board of the WA Opera Society and president of the WA Ladies Hockey Association.

She also served on the board of management of Mosman Park School for the Deaf and was president of the Western Australian Women’s Council of the Liberal Party.

Bertha Beecroft was made a member of the Order of the British Empire in 1972 for her community service.

Perry

Joseph Perry purchased the land around Reabold Hill in 1879. He was a well-known herdsman and horse breaker. He kept horses and cattle on the flats around Perry Lakes and Herdsman Lake.

He built a house on the slopes of Reabold Hill, and decided to keep the quarry and lime kilns at Reabold Hill so that he could sell the limestone to help build some of the City’s new buildings like Perth Town Hall.

The two lakes, which originally occupied the area owned by Joseph Perry helped name the area. In 1962 the area was to house the stadium that hosted the British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

Perry Lakes became known as a place where sporting dreams were achieved.

Reabold

Reabold Hill is located in the suburb of Floreat, and is 93 metres above sea level. From the top of the hill you can see to the city, and out to Rottnest. It is the highest peak in Perth. It used to be called One Tree Hill, and in 1839 Henry Trigg built kilns and quarried limestone to provide building material for some of Perth’s first buildings. It was then known as Limekiln Estate.

In 1916 Mr Frank Rea, the Mayor of Perth, renamed One Tree Hill to Reabold Hill by combining his name with that of William Bold who was the Perth Town Clerk in the early 1900s.

His plan was to encourage tourists and locals back to enjoy Reabold Hill’s view of Perth and the ocean, just like they had in the 1800s. The area was once a place where many would come to picnic by the lakes.

One day a group of picnickers reported seeing a strange creature in the mud. It had a long black neck which rose out of the water, a small head, covered with flaps of skin. The creature became known as “Old Boldy” the Bunyip of Perry Lakes and people became scared to visit the area.

Frank Rea’s plan changed that and Reabold Hill became a place of natural beauty again.

Chandler

Thomas Charles Chandler was born in 1873, and became a well-respected member of the Perth community. He became a teacher, and in 1913 was appointed as headmaster of Perth Boy’s School, the largest three-year secondary school in the state. He was recognised for his leadership and caring teaching style.

Thomas Chandler believed that physical training is very important in a school timetable. He himself enjoyed a variety of sports. Chandler taught English, but also believed that physical education was equally important, and often changed the timetable so the boys got more fitness training in a day. Thomas Chandler played cricket, tennis, golf, bowls, and reportedly loved to fish!

After Thomas Chandler died, the City of Perth named the street Floreat Park Primary School was later built on, as Chandler Avenue.

Thomas Chandler believed in education and achieving your potential!

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